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The question I hear from lots of people: is it worth getting a smartwatch which simply moves the notifications from your phone screen to your wrist? Aren’t we simply saving 10 seconds of time to remove the phone from your pocket? The answer is yes and yes. It is absolutely worth it. The best interaction is no interaction.

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I recently was a tech reviewer for the new WebGL book from Packt author Jos Dirksen called the Three.js Cookbook. It lets you get in and get out quickly.

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I've done a major refactoring which will make Amino easier to maintain and, eventually, better performance and portability. Part of this work involved moving the platform specific parts to their own node modules. This means you should no longer install aminogfx directly. Instead, install the appropriate platform specific module. Currently there is one for GL and one for Canvas. I've also added stage transparency support to Raspberry Pi!

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In what was possibly my most popular post of 2013, Why You Can’t Build A Smart phone, I explained why building a new smartphone platform was futile. Today, like any good author, I’m going completely contradict myself. Yes, it is possible to create a new smartphone platform. You just have to follow a few constraints.

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In the first two (1, 2 ) installments of this essay I covered overall system design, the window manager, and applications. I talked about how the user will communicate with the system, but I haven’t discussed much about how the system communicates back to the user. This brings us to the next big problem of today’s operating systems: notifications and concentration.

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In the future touch interfaces will take over most computing tasks but 10% of people will still need ‘full general purpose computers’. We can’t let the interface stagnate. This white paper represents a decade of my thinking on what is wrong with desktop style operating systems (WIMP) style and proposed solutions. PCs are not obsolete. They just need improvements to become ‘workstations’ again.

Last time I gave you an overview of what an Operating System would look like if we took away all the bad parts, leaving not too much left, and start building replacements. But what would these new parts look like? How would you start programs and manage windows? Without a filesystem how would the desktop folders work? For the answers to these questions and just so much more, keep reading.

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Note: Parts II and III are up now.

In the art world there is this idea of anti-art. The goal is to do all of the things backwards or wrong so that you can discover new rights. You have to tear down the world before you can build it again. I’m not entirely sure how it works, but they seem happy with it so I figured I’d give it a go with something that really needs shaking up: the desktop operating system.

Beforwarned. This post is an epic. Not epic in a"'that movie was awesome" sort of way. It's epic in a "3000 stanza poem you had to read in english class" way. Just FYI.

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Today we’re going to play with a new toolkit called Thrust. Thrust is an embeddable web view based on Chromium, similar to Atom-Shell or Node-webkit, but with one big difference. The Chromium renderer runs in a separate process that your app communicates with over a simple JSON based RPC pipe. This one architectural decision makes Thrust far more flexible and reliable.

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The follow up to last year’s Beautiful Lego, Mike Doyle brings us back for more of the best Lego models from around the world. This time the theme is Dark. As the book explains it: “destructive objects, like warships and mecha, and dangerous and creepy animals… dark fantasies of dragons and zombies and spooks” I like the concept of a theme as it helps focus the book. The theme of Dark was stretched a bit to include banks and cigarettes, and vocaloids (mechanical japanese pop-stars), but it’s still 300+ gorgeous pages of the world’s best Lego art. Beautiful Lego 2 is filled to the brim with Zerg like insect hordes, a lot of Krakens, and some of the cutest mechs you’ve ever seen.

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My hatred of C and C++ is world renown, or at least it should be. It's not that I hate the languages themselves, but the ancient build chain. A hack of compilers and #defines that have to be modified for every platform. Oh, and segfaults and memory leaks. The usual. Unfortunately, if you want to write fast graphics code you're pretty much going to be stuck with C or C++, and that's where Amino comes in.

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I recently added the ability to set individual pixels in Amino, my Node JS based OpenGL scene graph for the Raspberry Pi. To test it out I thought I'd write a simple Mandlebrot generator. The challenge with CPU intensive work is that Node only has one thread. If you block that thread your UI stops. Dead. To solve this we need a background processing solution.

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A post about Arthur Whitney and kOS made the rounds a few days ago. It concerns a text editor Arthur made with four lines of K code, and a complete operating system he’s working on. These were all built in K, a vector oriented programming language derived from APL. This reminded me that I really need to look at APL after all of the language ranting I’ve done recently.

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